Antique French Fashion Accessories

Today’s post is all about the pictures. And a few words. I’ve mentioned before that some dolls are collectors. French fashion dolls are notorious for this.  Here are some of the antique accessories my FF’s have collected: Wood, hand-painted fan with orange silk ribbon. Purchased at Paris flea market. I tried to barter, but my shaky french didn’t help. Faux ivory fan with hand-painted silk leaves. Two pairs of doll-sized … Continue reading

Une Petite Fille

This sweet, tiny poupee spoke to me at a doll show, so I had to own her. She stands only 10 1/2″ (26.5 cm) tall. At first glance, I thought that her fine cotton dress was old/original. But the lady who was selling her told me that a friend of hers made the dress. It is a beautiful reproduction and was both machine and hand sewn. One day, though, I … Continue reading

Pondering Provenance

Merriam Webster defines provenance as: “the history of ownership of a valued object or work of art or literature.”  As doll collectors, we rarely get to know anything about the provenance of a doll we purchase. We have all been told questionable stories of a doll’s history. How often has a dealer told you that a doll is from his or her “private collection”? But who owns the provenance of … Continue reading

Shoes, Socks and a Pair of Stockings

One day, I’ll show you how to make shoes for your dolls. I know how, but it’s a bit fidgety. In the meantime, let’s look at some doll shoes made by other people. First, here is a pair of antique heeled boots. They are black leather, decorated with buckles and shiny metal buttons. They belong to this lovely lady. She is a German, painted-eye fashion with such a sweet face. Her … Continue reading

My 17th Century Bru Fairy

Meet Mademoiselle Bru. She told me that she wants to dress in 17th century costumes. I think she wants to be a fairy. This is an early 17th century masque costume drawing by Inigo Jones (1573-1652). He was an architect, stage designer and theatrical masque designer. When I got hooked on 17th century embroidery, a good friend asked me how it applied to dolls. My first reaction was, why does … Continue reading

Ah, Huret!

Adelaide Calixte Huret first patented an articulated doll with a porcelain head in 1850 in France. Her doll represented an idealized child, with a dreamy face and a light-weight, hollow gutta percha body. The earliest dolls, like mine, had glazed porcelain heads. Later Hurets were made with unglazed (or bisque) heads. All were 45cm or 17 3/4″ tall. The years from 1850 to 1880 in Paris were the Golden Age … Continue reading

Too Many Dolls

For many years, I collected every doll that caught my fancy. It was intoxicating to see a pretty face or a fine costume and take the plunge. I had so many dolls that it was hard to arrange them all in my doll cabinets. They weren’t the finest dolls, but they were pretty. I have to admit that I had dreams of redressing every one of them. It took a … Continue reading