A Finish and a Fix

The other day I started trying to get a handle on all my unfinished projects and gave up. My solution was to just finish something. Anything. So I finished my Huret’s slip. Sorry the photo looks like a mug shot. With her kid body, it’s hard to get her to stand straight in her stand, so I just photographed her lying down. I love how the slip makes her skirt … Continue reading

The Gathering

It is no mystery to me why the 2003 movie titled, The Gathering, was a horror movie. I do not enjoy horror movies and I do not enjoy gathering. Cartridge pleating is such a neat, orderly, precise process. But for some applications, and for most ruffles, it’s just too much. Since I had hand sewn 6 feet of ruffles for the 42″ circumference slip for my Huret, I just had to break … Continue reading

Getting Back To It

I’ve been slacking lately.  I took the period between Thanksgiving and New Years to stay busy with stuff other than dolls, sewing, embroidery, and designing my mini casket. And since the New Year, I have been working a lot on the boring, tedious end-of-year accounting work my real job requires. Also, I decided to make myself some new clothes. I’ve started to bore even myself with my EVERY DAY wardrobe of … Continue reading

Where I’ve Been

Last weekend, Supergirl (SG), Dear Husband (DH) and I went to the beach.  SG had 2 days off school for teacher meetings. Several years ago, when DH and I went to the beach in December, SG scoffed at our silliness. Who would want to go to the beach in the winter time?? She gets it now. We visited her Great Aunt, who lives in Nags Head, swam in the hotel … Continue reading

Cartridge Pleating

For those of you who may not be familiar with the term, “cartridge pleating” is used to fit way too much fabric into a waistband. It creates a very full skirt. Here’s my Huret wearing her new skirt with her embroidered wool jacket. Pretty cute, huh? And here’s my Huret Book. It’s 3 1/2″ tall. Appropriately for a French doll, I bought it in Paris, in a stationer’s store in Montmartre. … Continue reading

Piping is Easy

I think the coolest thing about piping is that it looks impressive and finishes a garment beautifully but it is really easy to do. I have chosen to make my Huret’s new skirt with a peaked waistband and corded piping cut on the bias. Since the skirt will be cartridge pleated, I must finish all sides of the waistband before it is sewn to the skirt. The first step is … Continue reading

A New Project

It’s taken 2 days of struggling with my computer to get it to upload pictures to my blog. I’m pooped, but happy that I got it working again. That computers can be working perfectly one day, then all fouled up the next makes my head explode. Since I’m practically finished with the flip girls, I need a new doll project to work on. Since the other projects I am working … Continue reading

Costume Inspiration

Sometimes aimlessly wandering around the internet reaps rewards, but not often.  One such serendipitous journey led me to The Portrait Timeline website. It features portraits and historical paintings from ancient times to the 1930’s. I first searched the 1600’s and was surprised by this colorful costume on a 2 year old girl, c. 1602. I love this embroidered jacket and skirt from 1617. And what décolletage! Then I moved on … Continue reading

Another Finished Project, Maybe

This weekend, I finished my Huret’s jacket, maybe. The dress she’s wearing underneath has puffy sleeves, so it looks a bit lumpy at the shoulders. Eventually, she’ll wear it with a matching (or contrasting) skirt and a non-puffy-sleeved blouse. This is the pattern I used for the jacket. It is from Francois Theimer’s wonderful reproduction of La Poupee Modele. The original instructions call it a house shirt and recommend white … Continue reading

Ah, Huret!

Adelaide Calixte Huret first patented an articulated doll with a porcelain head in 1850 in France. Her doll represented an idealized child, with a dreamy face and a light-weight, hollow gutta percha body. The earliest dolls, like mine, had glazed porcelain heads. Later Hurets were made with unglazed (or bisque) heads. All were 45cm or 17 3/4″ tall. The years from 1850 to 1880 in Paris were the Golden Age … Continue reading