Before and After

My flip doll is complete and is for sale on eBay. It is always nerve wracking to watch my stuff on eBay. Who knows if I’ll make a profit? I usually list my items at a low starting price to attract more bidders, but that means my doll may sell for far less than she’s worth. I’ve mostly been lucky, but it’s a crap shoot. Here she is before and after. … Continue reading

Shoes, Socks and a Pair of Stockings

One day, I’ll show you how to make shoes for your dolls. I know how, but it’s a bit fidgety. In the meantime, let’s look at some doll shoes made by other people. First, here is a pair of antique heeled boots. They are black leather, decorated with buckles and shiny metal buttons. They belong to this lovely lady. She is a German, painted-eye fashion with such a sweet face. Her … Continue reading

Beginning Hand Sewing for Dolls Part 3

Today, I am going to show you how to begin sewing your doll’s slip. We will sew the back seam, finish the open back edges and hem the slip. Next week, we’ll attach the waistband and sew on the lace. Read through the instructions before you begin. At the end, I’ve listed a few hints for easier, faster stitching. In the 19th century, undergarments, blouses and other garments that were … Continue reading

The Bloggin’ Blues

If you’ve been following my blog, you’ve probably figured out that I have a lot to talk about. I do. The only problem is, writing my blog leaves me very little time to do other things, like sewing, reading, and playing with Supergirl. And I do have a regular, paying job, too. Even though I work at home, on my own schedule, it’s kind of important to spend some time … Continue reading

Another Tiny Tale

This tiny, all-bisque doll stands just over 2 1/2″ (6.5 cm.) tall and I love her. She is not considered to be a Lilliputian, even though she’s the same size. She was made in Germany and her body, legs and head are all one piece. Only her peg-jointed arms move. This type of doll is often called “early” all bisque, but they probably weren’t made before 1880. Her cobalt blue … Continue reading

My 17th Century Bru Fairy

Meet Mademoiselle Bru. She told me that she wants to dress in 17th century costumes. I think she wants to be a fairy. This is an early 17th century masque costume drawing by Inigo Jones (1573-1652). He was an architect, stage designer and theatrical masque designer. When I got hooked on 17th century embroidery, a good friend asked me how it applied to dolls. My first reaction was, why does … Continue reading

Judy Brown Saw My Future

I loved my dolls when I was small. There was nothing better than a new doll on Christmas morning. I played hard with my dolls, so few of them survived. As with most girls at the time, I started with baby dolls, moved on to girl dolls, then graduated to Barbie. The first doll I really remember was Marybel Gets Well. I loved making her sick or injured, then curing … Continue reading

A New Old Doll

I am sometimes intimidated by owning antique dolls over 100 years old. It is a big responsibility being the caretaker for a part of history. Antique cloth dolls intimidate me the most. They need to be protected from sunlight, humidity, temperature changes, dust, moths and other bugs, and handling by humans.   That’s why several years ago for my birthday I got two reproduction Izannah Walker dolls made by Gail … Continue reading

The Tiniest Mignonettes

Today’s post is a small one about small dolls. They are tiny, all-bisque dolls known as Lilliputians or les Lilliputiens in French. Most Lilliputians measure only 2 1/4 to 2 3/4 inches (6-7 cm.) tall, have dome heads with swivel necks, painted eyes, peg or wire jointed limbs, and painted blue boots or bare feet. Coleman’s The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Dolls, lists production of Lilliputians as early as 1881-82. They … Continue reading

Ah, Huret!

Adelaide Calixte Huret first patented an articulated doll with a porcelain head in 1850 in France. Her doll represented an idealized child, with a dreamy face and a light-weight, hollow gutta percha body. The earliest dolls, like mine, had glazed porcelain heads. Later Hurets were made with unglazed (or bisque) heads. All were 45cm or 17 3/4″ tall. The years from 1850 to 1880 in Paris were the Golden Age … Continue reading